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Monday, November 24, 2014
One house, four 12-year-old girls
Meet the Cuttone quadruplets
Penny Frondelli/Herald
Morning preparations can be a trying process for the Cuttone sisters.

“How old are you?” I asked.

Four voices responded in unison: “12.”

“What’s your birthday?”

Again, four voices: “April 30.”

There was no echo in the room. Rather, it was the Cuttone sisters, quadruplets who will enter seventh grade at Woodland Middle School next week.

Born in one-minute intervals beginning at 11:22 p.m. on April 30, 2001 at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, Victoria, Rosanna, Daniella and Julia — from oldest to youngest — are fraternal twins who live in East Meadow, which they’ve always called home, with their mother, Sue, and father, Joe.

The sisters share a residence, a last name and a date of birth, but other than that, are vastly different. “Each have their own identity,” Joe explained.

All athletic in their own right, the girls play different sports — softball (Rosanna, Julia), volleyball (Victoria, Daniella), basketball (Rosanna) and cheerleading (Victoria, Daniella). It’s something that keeps the girls busy, but also creates a scheduling nightmare for the family. “Sometimes they’ll all have the same practice at the same time,” said Sue. “So you’re trying to figure out how to get one place to another.”

Often nicknamed the Quads by outsiders, the girls have a morning schedule down pat when getting ready for school, so as not to interfere with one another. And in school, they all have the same classes and teachers, but during different times of the day, per district regulations.

Graduates of McVey Elementary School, the girls were in the same kindergarten, first- and second-grade classes, but haven’t shared a class together since. Asked whether they enjoyed being in the same class as youngsters, their answer was a resounding “No!”

Though they say they enjoy time apart, it was evident, while sitting with the family in their Sixth Street home, how much they enjoy being around one another. Simple questions turned quickly to jokes, which then escalated to laughing fits, an apparent norm among the four of them.

When they are together at home, they play pool volleyball, Nintendo Wii and something they call “Video Star,” where they record a dance a routine to a popular song.

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