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Thursday, September 18, 2014
Bringing the best of Long Island to Crossroads Farm
By Rossana Weitekamp
Photos: Rossana Weitekamp
Produce from Half Hollow Nursery, owned by Malverne native Lloyd Rasweiler

It’s a typical Thursday in the thick of a hot summer afternoon in Malverne, but activity on Crossroads Farm is bustling.

Set up on the farm are over a dozen vendors selling everything from fresh product to homemade jams, specialty coffees, cheeses and more. “We have the farmers market here on Thursdays from 1:00 - 6:30 p.m.,” said Lona Graepel of Long Island Farmers Markets. Ms. Graepel organizes the farmers market for Crossroads Farm at Grossmann’s and other locations throughout Long Island.

Interestingly enough, much of the produce sold at the farmers market comes from Malverne’s own Lloyd Rasweiler, 94, whose ancestors were one of the main farming families in Malverne and its environs over 100 years ago. Mr. Rasweiler, who relocated out east many years ago, is owner of the Half Hollow Nursery, a 650-acre farm in Laurel located on the North Fork. Each week, a truckload of cucumbers, tomatoes, onions, corn and more arrives for sale at the farmers market here. In the fall they bring fresh root vegetables.

Another orchard from Pomona in Rockland county supplies the farmers market with locally grown apples, pears, strawberries, cider. “They have a huge orchard there with thousands of apple trees,” said Graepel.

In addition to fresh produce, there are many other head-turning goodies in the farmers market. Miss Amy’s Preserves, a pioneer in farmers markets on Long Island, claims to be one of the first farmers market vendors anywhere on Long Island and has been doing the farmers market circuit for over 17 years. The company sells 16 different flavored preserves as well as other items like organic honey and different flavored mustards. They are based out of Blue Point, NY.

Daniel Rubin runs the Sconeheads Bakery stand at the farmers market and uses commercial kitchens in Amityville and Brooklyn to bake 65 different scones with ingredients from local farms and dairies.

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