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Monday, April 27, 2015
LBMC to declare bankruptcy?
But hospital says business plan for possible merger with SNCH is not finalized
Herald file photo
LBMC officials said that merger talks with South Nassau Communities Hospital are continuing.

State Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg says that the Long Beach Medical Center will file for bankruptcy as part of a plan to eliminate its debt, as merger talks with South Nassau Communities Hospital continue. But hospital officials say that such talk is premature, and that a business plan has yet to be finalized.

According to Weisenberg, the move to file is one of a number of recommendations made by the state to enable LBMC to merge with SNCH. The newly created entity would have access to Federal Emergency Management Agency funding for a new integrated health delivery system. Weisenberg said he has been lobbying the state to reopen the Long Beach facility.

“South Nassau is coming in, and they don’t want to absorb [LBMC’s] existing debt,” he said. “[LBMC has] no choice — Long Beach Medical is going through a bankruptcy proceeding, while South Nassau and the state Health Department work together to establish an urgent-care center for the people of Long Beach.”

Ray Ellmer, a longtime Long Beach resident who sits on the medical center’s Board of Trustees, also said that it would file for bankruptcy. “Long Beach is definitely declaring bankruptcy, and it will get rid of some debt,” Ellmer said.

In a statement, hospital spokeswoman Sharon Player said that a memorandum of understanding that LBMC signed with South Nassau includes a nondisclosure agreement, which prevents the discussion of details of the negotiations. Player also said that Ellmer was not speaking on behalf of LBMC.

  “While negotiations continue with South Nassau Communities Hospital,” she said, “no decisions have been made as to the future business plans of Long Beach Medical Center.”

One city official, who declined to be identified, said that LBMC had yet to file for bankruptcy. “My guess is that it’s seriously being considered,” the official said.

The 162-bed hospital closed after 10 feet of water flooded its basement during Hurricane Sandy, causing roughly $100 million in damage. All of the major work to allow two wings to open, including the emergency department, was completed in June.

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sweitz

Does anyone read the New York Post? How long will it take someone at the Herald to remove this comment and they have removed all of my other posting, which were true and accurate and complies with every aspect of the TOS agreement. After you read this, please ask LBMC to post a copy any settlement agreement involving the subject reported in the NY Post article. The following article involving the Long Beach Medical Center Hospital appears on the NY POST website. It's my understanding that Long Beach Medical Center has accepted a settlement agreement since this article appeared on January 6, 2009. How come no one - including our state and local elected officials or the governor are NOT asking questions about the conduct alleged in the lawsuit or the settlement agreement. Congress enacted the Bankruptcy Code to easy the burdens of the poor but honest debtor and to offer a fresh start free of the burdens of debt. Do some basic research and learn more about this lawsuit and then decide if LBMC deserves the protection of the Bankruptcy Code. According to an article on liherald.com, State Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg says that the Long Beach Medical Center will file for bankruptcy as part of a plan to eliminate its debt, as merger talks with South Nassau Communities Hospital continue

‘SCAM’BUSTERS

By Carl CampanileJanuary 6, 2009 | 7:29am

Two hospital workers helped uncover an alleged Medicaid drug-treatment scam that prosecutors say has cheated taxpayers out of $50 million, The Post has learned.

The heroic whistleblowers in the fraud case – first reported in yesterday’s Post – are Enrico Montaperto, a former social worker involved in patient admissions at Parkway Hospital, and Dr. Mathew Gelfand, the director of Long Beach Medical Center’s outpatient methadone treatment.

EDITORIAL: TRULY SICKENING FRAUD

No criminal charges were filed against the seven New York hospitals named, but the state Attorney General’s Office and Brooklyn federal prosecutors have filed two suits alleging a multimillion-dollar fraud scheme.

A spokesman for state Attorney General Andrew Cuomo declined to comment on why his office didn’t file criminal charges, but authorities can collect triple the financial damages in civil cases and can also close a facility.

Montaperto alleged that medical personnel were not even involved in patients’ screening.

“The initial admitting assessments were conducted by nonmedical personnel by completing forms initially created and provided by SpecialCare,” he said in recently unsealed court papers.

SpecialCare Hospital Management Corp. is a national firm that had contracts to steer drug addicts to the hospitals, a practice that the state and the feds charge amounted to illegal kickbacks.

SpecialCare is a defendant in the case along with six hospitals: Downtown in Manhattan, Parkway in Queens, Long Beach Medical Center, St. Joseph’s Medical Center in Yonkers, Columbia Memorial in Hudson and Benedictine in Kingston.

North Shore Division of Montefiore Medical Center in The Bronx – which was Our Lady of Mercy when it was allegedly involved – settled with prosecutors for $4.5 million and was removed as a defendant.

“Not only did said personnel have no medical training, but they had no formal education, licensing or certification in the field of alcohol and substance abuse,” Montaperto said.

He also claimed medical records were “fabricated or routinely exaggerated” to allow patients who were not hard-core addicts to meet admission requirements. Dr. Warren Licht, a supervisor of Downtown Hospital’s detox program, allegedly told officials the program opened to accommodate an increase in drug-addict admissions, when, in fact, the hospital was actually advertising to lure patients.

Gelfand suspected something was amiss because patients were not sent to outpatient clinics for subsequent treatment.

“The New Vision program is in fact a facade for a patient-referral scheme,” Gelfand said in court papers.

The hospitals and SpecialCare have all denied wrongdoing.

carl.campanile@nypost.com

Friday, November 29, 2013 | Report this
sweitz

The following are my opinions afar reading the Herald article, "LBMC to declare bankruptcy"

Does anyone else see a problem with this direct quote, ""Ellmer said that he and other trustees learned about the bankruptcy proceedings from Chief Executive Officer Doug Melzer two months ago, at a monthly meeting." Where have the members of the Board of Trustees been? There are some very successful member of the board with board business experience. LBMC is considering bankruptcy and Chief Executive Officer Doug Melzer is making that decision on his own……

Chief Executive Officer Doug Melzer has been not been seen or heard in the public eye for over a year, while the hospital remained closed, the employees were terminated without payment of accused benefits, and the hospital went ahead with multimillion dollar repairs and now Doug tells the board its time to file for bankruptcy…..

There is something wrong here folks. Where has Doug been, vacation? How many vacations, how many promotions to staff to run a non-existent hospital? It's time for full disclosure! Did the board authorize a payment of close to $200,000 for some type of work in the ER with the funds to be "borrowed" from the $6M grant from SNCH allegedly to pay a vendor that is related to a member of the board of trustees - In the Bankruptcy field thats called a preference since it treats this creditor differently that other creditors. It also raises some suspicions for the need for a forensic accounting, at least in my mind.

How much is the fine for LBMC negotiated discussed in the NY Post Article on January 6, 2009, "Two hospital workers helped uncover an alleged Medicaid drug-treatment scam that prosecutors say has cheated taxpayers out of $50 million, The Post has learned.

The heroic whistleblowers in the fraud case – first reported in yesterday’s Post – are Enrico Montaperto, a former social worker involved in patient admissions at Parkway Hospital, and Dr. Mathew Gelfand, the director of Long Beach Medical Center’s outpatient methadone treatment."

What are your thoughts? Please share and let's get a dialogue started on this important issue - Long Beach needs a hospital run by new trustees and new administrators, please let speak out if you share my opinions or if you disagree….

Saturday, November 30, 2013 | Report this
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