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Oceanside artist paints mural at South Shore Craft Brewery

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There’s a new mural in town.

Alexandra Domanico, of Oceanside, has transformed the blank brick outer wall of South Shore Craft Brewery, on Hampton Road, into the establishment’s “huge centerpiece,” owner Hugh Howard said.

Domanico, an up-and-coming, 30-year-old muralist, painted a brewing system over bright green, geometric shapes on the front of the Oceanside brewery earlier this month. The project took about eight days to complete — a total of 60 hours — and included the company’s logos on other parts of the wall leading to the entrance.

“It came out phenomenal,” Howard said. “A photo is a photo, but when you see it in person it’s a different thing. It really stands out on the white wall.”

Domanico is a 2008 Oceanside High School graduate whose passion is creating art. She earned a degree in fine arts from Adelphi University in 2013, and recently began studying graphic design to help her create murals.

She embarked on her first community art project in 2013, collaborating with Oceanside Lutheran Church, which she has attended since childhood, on a mural inside the church celebrating modern saints. She also did painting projects with children in the Sunday school program.

Since then, Domanico has painted around 10 murals, including two in Patchogue and one that was the backdrop of a theater production at Oceanside School No. 2. One of the Patchogue murals won a mural contest in 2015. The 40-by-15-foot piece, her largest so far, is her interpretation of Patchogue in the early 1900s.

Domanico frequents South Shore Craft Brewery, where her brother, Michael, 32, often plays guitar and sings. Howard recently mentioned to Michael that he wanted a mural done outside, and Michael told him about his sister’s work.

“In talking with her, I said, ‘Let’s do it,’” Howard said. “And she did great. It actually gives the place a different vibe. People look at it; they’re talking about it.”

The artist described a long process for creating the 15-by-30-foot piece. First, she photographed the wall and took measurements. Then she compiled reference images of brewing systems, and sketched her own design. She then transferred her sketches to a digital illustration.

To paint the mural, she used a grid method and painter’s tape to ensure accurate scale and straight lines. Her mother, Sharon Domanico, helped fill in solid colors with paint and touched up spots throughout the process.

Alexandra stood on a lift to paint higher parts of the mural, which she said was a challenge when she wanted to stand back and look at the piece as a whole, because it meant getting on and off the lift to assess her progress.

“The process of making a large-scale design is pretty satisfying,” she said. “Stepping back at the end and seeing my almost exact intentions come to fruition after really hard work is very fulfilling.”

As a result of the brewery artwork, Domanico has received more mural clients. And Howard said he planned to have her do more work inside the brewery in the winter.

“Art has always been a part of my life,” she said, “and I do want this to be more of a career for myself. I’m working toward that now.”