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Cloudy,74°
Monday, September 1, 2014

Family-friendly . . . disciplined yet flexible

The Buckley School of Irish Dance
In Lynbrook/East Rockaway (Temporary location)
(718) 965-9424

While lessons at The Buckley School of Irish Dance are clearly traditional, its management equally respects the dynamics of today’s family. Atmosphere is friendly, rules are not too rigid, and cost is kept affordable by not requiring the purchase of expensive dance outfits or hair pieces.

The Buckley School of Irish Dance and Music was founded in 1976 as a family business. Originally from Ireland, the Buckley family started out with their own Irish band. They also danced competitively in the All World Championships in Dublin, Ireland, and throughout the United States.

Today, the school is led and operated by Bernadette Buckley Kash. After graduating from Pace University, she went into the business world and opened dance schools in Queens and Brooklyn. By 1988, she opted to exclusively pursue a career as an Irish dance instructor. In addition to several Brooklyn locations, she has taught at Lynbrook’s Buckley School since 1995, first at Tally Ho Fire House, and later, at the VFW. Due to a fire last year, The Buckley School has been temporarily housed in East Rockaway. Plans are to return to the VFW soon. Kash is a registered member of the Irish Dance Teacher’s Association of North America and the Irish Dance Commission in Dublin, Ireland. She has been a certified TCRG since 1992.

Students include boys and girls from ages four through 18. Lessons are given in Jig, Reel, Hornpipe steps and Ceili group dances. In addition to traditional Irish dance music, the school also includes contemporary. Students get to perform at community events, parades and fundraisers.

Costumes at Buckley are traditional green dresses with gold lining, which can sometimes be purchased as gently used. Should a student outgrow it, the school offers the option to help sell it to another student. In addition to the traditional dress, students can choose to wear a black skirt, black short sleeve bodysuit and black tights (for parades) or white socks (for shows). Irish dance sweatshirts can also be worn for parades. Girls at advanced levels wear a black velvet dress, while boys wear a white shirt and black slacks. As for footwear, girls wear Irish lace up and boys wear jazz shoes. Hard shoes are only purchased if necessary, and at the most advanced level.

For class schedules, locations and other information, call the school or visit the website at www.brooklynirishdance.com.

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