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Partly Cloudy,43°
Sunday, April 20, 2014
One house, four 12-year-old girls
(Page 2 of 2)
Penny Frondelli/Herald
Morning preparations can be a trying process for the Cuttone sisters.

Sue, who grew up in Bethpage, and Joe, a Levittown native, married in 1996, and then moved to East Meadow. Sue’s first sonogram forewarned of multiple children, but initially showed three, not four. “When [the doctor] said triplets, I must have turned white,” Joe said, “because the doctor said, ‘Are you OK?’”

As is the case with any first-time parents, doubts and financial questions arose. And when it came time for a second sonogram, they said the doctor viewed the ultrasound and started laughing. He then informed them of a fourth fetus, to which Joe replied, “What’s one more?”

But they got by, thanks largely to support from friends and family, especially in the early stages. “When they were younger, it was more physically challenging. Now it’s emotionally challenging,” Sue said with a laugh.

The parents have since become accustomed to a noisy and energetic household, but said they still make a point to go out for dinner together once a month. “You need that time,” Joe said.

When asked what reaction they usually receive when people learn they are quadruplets, they said it goes something like: “Oh my God!” followed by a “How do you do it?” to Sue and Joe, or a “But you’re not identical!” to the girls.

Like any sisters, the girls playfully mock each other, but still make sure to always look out for one another. “Let’s say someone gets picked on,” Julia said. “You stand up for them.”

Holidays are always an experience in the house — especially birthdays. Each gets her own cake, said Sue, which can cause difficulties considering each prefers her own type, such as Red Velvet, ice cream, or a One Direction-themed pastry.

For Halloween, they do group-themed costumes, like Wizard of Oz characters, or life-sized candy. This year, they said, they plan on dressing as fictional princesses.

Another popular group activity involves the girls watching home videos from early childhood. “When we watch it, we laugh, and we remember some stuff that happened,” Daniella said.

When asked what they are most looking forward to in the upcoming school year, unsurprisingly, different answers were shouted.

“Sports!”

“Lunch!”

“New friends!”

But what wasn’t said is the one thing that they know they will always have — one another.

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