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Saturday, October 25, 2014

In Long Beach, the 'overwhelming' cleanup after the storm
(Page 3 of 4)
Richard Ejnes/Facebook
The West End, like many parts of Long Beach, was turned into a river when Hurricane Sandy hit.

Goodman said that driving around the city is dangerous because traffic signals are inoperable. “People are driving crazy down here, speeding down the intersections,” she said. “You’re taking your life in your hands if you drive down here.”

Stacey Weiner, who lives in the East End with her husband and three kids, said that while her home did not sustain major damage, her parents’ home in the Westholme area was destroyed. Still, the loss of power means visiting their friend, Martin Brull, in Rockville Centre, or her in-laws in Plainview to shower, do laundry and have dinner.

“It’s been pretty traumatizing for my kids — we’ve seen situations where guns were drawn,” she said, explaining that her family witnessed a potential break-in and dispute driving back to Long Beach through Oceanside.

Another time, Weiner said that her husband waited on line for two hours to gas up in Island Park last Saturday night, but left after he heard gunshots.

“Police were putting on bullet proof vests,” Weiner said. “There hasn’t been much crime in Long Beach, but still, it’s crazy. The National Guard and police … everybody who is here are patrolling my block every 10 minutes, and you have to be in your house by 6 p.m. Anyone who is in the street that they feel they need to take in, they’ll take in.”

Weiner noted the overwhelming, exhausting feeling that residents have as they attempt to rebuild or clean out their homes.

“People were in a state of shock and then they realized that they can’t be anymore and have to work to put things back together,” she said. “My mom has been doing it for days — you have no choice, you can’t run away.”

Weiner said that she had to travel up to White Plains, N.Y. to find a rental car, and added that finding gas was still extremely difficult.

“My husband and I were trying to find out where to get gas,” she said, adding that they were able to purchase a 20-gallon tank at a marine store. Others, she said, have taken gas from damaged jet skis or boats.

“You have to think a little differently to survive,” she said.

Ives also said that finding a rental car has proved difficult.

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