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COMMUNITY NEWS

Bristal honored for excellence, Alzheimer’s care

Assisted-living center named a Caring Star of 2016

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An East Meadow assisted-living center was honored among the top senior communities in the country for service excellence and Alzheimer’s care last month.

Caring.com named the Bristal at East Meadow, at 40 Merrick Ave., a Caring Star of 2016 on Nov. 30. In reviews from the center’s residents and their family members, the Bristal earned a five-star consumer rating — the highest possible score — and met other qualifying criteria for the national award.

Caring.com is a popular website for family caregivers seeking support and resources for aging parents, spouses and loved ones. Headquartered in San Mateo, Calif., it provides information, online support groups and a comprehensive senior care directory for the U.S., with nearly 100,000 consumer ratings and reviews and a toll-free senior-living referral line.

According to representatives of the website, the majority of family caregivers say they turn to the Internet and consumer reviews when researching senior-living centers, relying on them more than in-person recommendations from geriatric professionals or medical personnel. The Caring Stars list was introduced five years ago to help consumers narrow senior-living options to the most-acclaimed communities.

Andy Cohen, Caring.com’s CEO and co-founder, congratulated the staff of the Bristal at East Meadow for the award. “This important milestone speaks volumes about the positive difference [the Bristal] is making in serving older adults,” he said, “and we join with the local community in celebrating their accomplishment.”

Jennifer Eipel, the executive director of the facility for 17 years, said she believed the award was well deserved, because the Bristal is staffed with experienced professionals who enhance residents’ quality of life, with special care given to those suffering from memory loss. They create an environment in which older people maintain their dignity while allowing families to be free of the enormously draining role of primary caregiver, she explained.

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